Back when I was young, DCMontreal Commentary, DCMontreal Light, History, Humor, News, Nostalgia, Opinion, Weather, Wordpress

Spring Break Used to be Easter

They say that one of the signs you’re getting old is that you find yourself, more and more often, using phrases such as: When I was a boy/girl, Back when I was young, In my day, When I was a kid. Well, you get the idea. Rather than fight this tendency I’ve decided to embrace it!

I welcome others to post similar pieces and let me know so I can link to them here.
When I was a kid, Spring Break was Easter, four days that involved at least some time in church and definitely no wet T-shirt or beer drinking contests.

As I stepped out of my apartment building this morning I found myself wondering if I had the day wrong. I was setting off on my weekday morning run – something I’ve been doing for more years than a care to remember, but my knees will let you know – but I had to check to see that it wasn’t Sunday. The street was deserted; all was quiet, peaceful even. What was this? No kids shouting, no delivery trucks double-parked and bothering drivers. Then it hit me – Spring Break had arrived. What a misnomer that is when you consider that the temperature with the wind chill factored in as about -28C today.

When I was going to school we started on the Tuesday after Labor Day, had a day off at Canadian Thanksgiving (in October), then nothing until we broke up for Christmas. On December 23rd we left school and didn’t return until January 7th – the day after Epiphany. Ahead of us was the long stretch until Good Friday with no scheduled holidays. All our hopes were pinned on a few snow days to break the everlasting winter. At Easter we had a four-day weekend; Good Friday and Easter Monday sandwiching the Easter Weekend. Then it was Victoria Day around May 24th followed by the home-stretch to June 23rd and summer.

T-Shirt

Wet T-Shirt contestants shiver

For me as a kid, Spring Break was Easter, four days that involved at least some time in church and definitely no wet T-shirt or beer drinking contests. Even when I was at university I was too early to take advantage of Study Week; alas, it was implemented just a couple of years after I graduated. (Somehow I don’t think that ‘Study’ part fooled anyone!)

Now Spring Break is de rigueur at all levels of education and drives millions of dollars in tourism to ski hills and beach resorts alike. Some schools even have a two-week break, but that’s a bit much, I’d rather plug away and finish in time to enjoy our all too short summer.

Hope you all have a safe Spring Break. Even if I am a little jealous!

MeDCMontreal is a Montreal writer born and raised who likes to establish balance and juxtapositions; a bit of this and a bit of that, a dash of Yin and a soupçon of Yang, some Peaks and Freans and maybe a bit of a sting in the tail! Please follow DC on Twitter @DCMontreal and on Facebook, and add him on Google+
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Back when I was young, History, Montreal, Nostalgia, Wordpress

Back When I Was Young: Movie theatres were BYOF

Today’s Daily Prompt: Modern asks whether we are comfortable being citizens of the 21st century. From time to time I post about “Back when I was young”; this isn’t to say that I’m not comfortable in my current time and place, but I think many people (sadly not all) occasionally yearn for the time of their youth. Here’s an example of a post dealing with how the movie-going experience has changed.

 
They say that one of the signs you’re getting old is that you find yourself, more and more often, using phrases such as: When I was a boy/girl, Back when I was young, In my day, When I was a kid. Well, you get the idea. Rather than fight this tendency I’ve decided to embrace it by posting, on occasion, blog entries the title of which will begin with “Back when I was Young”.
I welcome others to post similar pieces and let me know so I can link to them here.

Back when I was young, like many kids we used to go to the movies. Montreal, as was the case in most cities, had its share of movie theatres – we Anglophones didn’t call them cinemas, to us they were movie theatres. These often elaborately designed single-screen theatres showed films every night and had matinees on the weekends and during school holidays. I recall the price being 75 cents before seven o’clock at which time the cost of admission shot up to a whopping $1.25! For that princely sum you were treated to a cartoon – usually Blake Edwards‘ Pink Panther which could be used in both French and English theatres as there was no dialogue – in addition to the main feature.

But that’s not the issue, the price of everything has gone up over time, it’s just what happens. As I recall things, the admission fee  got you into the theatre to see the movie. There were, of course, snack bars where you could buy soft drinks, popcorn, candies and chips. But these were just for convenience because many people, perhaps most, brought their own snacks to the movie. I’m not talking about smuggling in contraband Twizzlers or Reese’s Pieces, sneaking past ushers who look like they want to pat down movie goers. The goodies we brought to the theatre were most welcome, after all you had paid your admission. It was a movie theatre, not a restaurant – it was a Bring Your Own Food establishment

Dunkin Donuts logo

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Many’s the time we would bring in, openly and honestly, a box of a dozen Dunkin’ Donuts and  Dairy Queen milkshakes. Others brought submarine sandwiches or even hamburgers. Some folks even made special snacks at home and, along with a thermos of coffee settled in to enjoy the movie and munch on a ham on rye.

These days the film is almost an afterthought; once you get past the vast array of food on offer at exorbitant prices and run the gamut of the umpteen video games in the lobby, you can finally settle down to watch the feature.

Long gone are the days when movie theatres were in the business of selling admission to films and providing convenience snack bar counters, but were BYOF!

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Back when I was young, History, Montreal, Nostalgia

Back When I Was Young: Movie theatres were BYOF

They say that one of the signs you’re getting old is that you find yourself, more and more often, using phrases such as: When I was a boy/girl, Back when I was young, In my day, When I was a kid. Well, you get the idea. Rather than fight this tendency I’ve decided to embrace it by posting, on occasion, blog entries the title of which will begin with “Back when I was Young”.
I welcome others to post similar pieces and let me know so I can link to them here.

Back when I was young, like many kids we used to go to the movies. Montreal, as was the case in most cities, had its share of movie theatres – we Anglophones didn’t call them cinemas, to us they were movie theatres. These often elaborately designed single-screen theatres showed films every night and had matinees on the weekends and during school holidays. I recall the price being 75 cents before seven o’clock at which time the cost of admission shot up to a whopping $1.25! For that princely sum you were treated to a cartoon – usually Blake Edwards‘ Pink Panther which could be used in both French and English theatres as there was no dialogue – in addition to the main feature.

But that’s not the issue, the price of everything has gone up over time, it’s just what happens. As I recall things, the admission fee  got you into the theatre to see the movie. There were, of course, snack bars where you could buy soft drinks, popcorn, candies and chips. But these were just for convenience because many people, perhaps most, brought their own snacks to the movie. I’m not talking about smuggling in contraband Twizzlers or Reese’s Pieces, sneaking past ushers who look like they want to pat down movie goers. The goodies we brought to the theatre were most welcome, after all you had paid your admission. It was a movie theatre, not a restaurant – it was a Bring Your Own Food establishment

Dunkin Donuts logo

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Many’s the time we would bring in, openly and honestly, a box of a dozen Dunkin’ Donuts and  Dairy Queen milkshakes. Others brought submarine sandwiches or even hamburgers. Some folks even made special snacks at home and, along with a thermos of coffee settled in to enjoy the movie and munch on a ham on rye.

These days the film is almost an afterthought; once you get past the vast array of food on offer at exorbitant prices and run the gamut of the umpteen video games in the lobby, you can finally settle down to watch the feature.

Long gone are the days when movie theatres were in the business of selling admission to films and providing convenience snack bar counters, but were BYOF!

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DCS_Grad_2 DCMontreal – Deegan Charles Stubbs – is a Montreal writer born and raised who likes to establish balance and juxtapositions; a bit of this and a bit of that, a dash of Yin and a soupçon of Yang, some Peaks and an occasional Frean and maybe a bit of a sting in the tail! Please follow DC on Twitter @DCMontreal and on Facebook, and add him on Google+
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