Lest We Forget: Remember To Remember On Wednesday

There is sure to be a plethora of media noise emanating from my southern neighbours for the next weeks, if not months (years?). Even with the election of Joe Biden, after four long days of painstaking ballot counting, the fireworks are not going to end soon. And once again he has, sadly, opted to beContinue reading “Lest We Forget: Remember To Remember On Wednesday”

A Canadian Leprechroon and Irish Superstitions

My maternal great grandparents were both born in Dublin. As was the case with many Irish at the time, not long after they married in the 1880s they emigrated to England. But of course, the bloodline remains. I’ve come to the conclusion that this makes me a Leprechroon. Yep, not an octoroon, nor a quadroon,Continue reading “A Canadian Leprechroon and Irish Superstitions”

Poppies: Old and New

Next Monday, November 11, is Remembrance Day in Canada. It used to be called Armistice Day and a minute of silence was observed at 11:00 a.m. (the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month) to commemorate the “official’ end of The Great War. I write official because numerous soldiers were killed afterContinue reading “Poppies: Old and New”

REPOST: World War One Centenary – Family Lore and Family Loss

I often wonder what those men who managed to survive the “War to end all wars”, my grandfather among them, felt when twenty-odd years later they watched their sons go off to the battlefields of Europe once again. With countless media reports and background pieces regarding the centenary of the start of World War One thisContinue reading “REPOST: World War One Centenary – Family Lore and Family Loss”

My Great-Grandfather’s World War One Lie

My great-grandfather, Ernest Henry Blackwell, was born in Sussex, England. As a young boy his family emigrated to Canada where he would spend the rest of his days. He met and married my great-grandmother, Annie Ellis, whose family had also made the move across the pond. They had five children: three sons and two daughters.Continue reading “My Great-Grandfather’s World War One Lie”

World War One Centenary: Family Lore and Family Loss

I often wonder what those men who managed to survive the “War to end all wars”, my grandfather among them, felt when twenty-odd years later they watched their sons go off to the battlefields of Europe once again. With countless media reports and background pieces regarding the centenary of the start of World War One thisContinue reading “World War One Centenary: Family Lore and Family Loss”

My Great-Grandfather’s World War One Lie

Originally posted on DCMontreal: Blowing the Whistle on Society:
My great-grandfather, Ernest Henry Blackwell, was born in Sussex, England. As a young boy his family emigrated to Canada where he would spend the rest of his days. He met and married my great-grandmother, Annie Ellis, whose family had also made the move across the pond.…

Remembrance Day 2015

DCMontreal – Deegan Charles Stubbs – is a Montreal writer born and raised who likes to establish balance and juxtapositions; a bit of this and a bit of that, a dash of Yin and a soupçon of Yang, some Peaks and an occasional Frean and maybe a bit of a sting in the tail! PleaseContinue reading “Remembrance Day 2015”

Melville Avenue: Then and Now

The original photo of my grandparents was taken during the mid-1940’s as they returned from an Armistice Day parade and ceremony (now Remembrance Day). Using the little knowledge and skill I have when it comes to photo enhancement, I have positioned them at precisely the same spot on the street as it is now.  FortunatelyContinue reading “Melville Avenue: Then and Now”

Tell Me The World Isn’t Going To Hell In A Handcart … Please

One hundred years ago the world was slipping into a vortex that has been called The Great War and the War to end all wars. Some thirty years later it would come to be called by its more common name, the First World War, or WWI. Seemingly relatively small events in eastern Europe – primarilyContinue reading “Tell Me The World Isn’t Going To Hell In A Handcart … Please”