Sorry, But We Canadians Do Not Apologize Too Much

Originally published September 3, 2013 This post was linked to by CNN to explain the backhanded apologies of some Canadians! Sorry, I didn’t realize you are a total arsehole unable to function in normal society It is often said that we Canadians are polite to a fault.  As a Canadian I would suggest, but certainly notContinue reading “Sorry, But We Canadians Do Not Apologize Too Much”

#TBT Sorry, But We Canadians Do Not Apologize Too Much

“Sorry, I didn’t realize you are a total arsehole unable to function in normal society” It is often said that we Canadians are polite to a fault.  As a Canadian I would suggest, but certainly not argue, that it is impossible to be overly polite. People point out that we say thank you too much,Continue reading “#TBT Sorry, But We Canadians Do Not Apologize Too Much”

The Economy is controlled by 1%, But 0.06% Control Peanuts

Touching wood I’m pleased to say I have no allergies. I touch wood because I understand they can develop later in life. When my brothers and I were young and mentioned that so-and-so had an allergy our mother would tell us we couldn’t afford to have allergies. I must admit that in retrospect it didContinue reading “The Economy is controlled by 1%, But 0.06% Control Peanuts”

Please Shelve Bread Crumbs With the Bread

While the universe is wrapped up in the discord within the Republican Party, I believe the time has come to tackle a more pressing issue; grocery store product placement.  In our busy world grocery shopping has become merely a weekly replenishing of basic necessities rather than the more sociable daily visits to butchers and bakersContinue reading “Please Shelve Bread Crumbs With the Bread”

World War One Centenary: Family Lore and Family Loss

Originally posted on Eclectic social commentary with a chuckle and maybe a sting in the tail:
My grandfather on the far right with the Piche brothers I often wonder what those men who managed to survive the “War to end all wars”, my grandfather among them, felt when twenty-odd years later they watched their sons go…