Boston, Boston bombing, DCMontreal Commentary, DCMontreal Light, Hockey, Humor, Montreal, Montreal Canadiens, News, Sports, Toronto

Bruins, Leafs and Scorpions

Bruins-Leafs

It’s NHL playoff time. Much like The Masters and the Kentucky Derby the playoffs are a true sports-themed harbinger of spring. The weather is getting more pleasant, the snow has just about all melted under the warm sun. Bars and restaurants open their terraces and make sure that there are adequate big-screen televisions to accommodate hockey-loving patrons. Will this be the year the Montreal Canadiens finally snap their too-long championship-less streak?

No Canadiens in the playoffs and we are anticipating the arrival of a late-season ice storm. I’m not sure about Mudville, but there’s certainly a lack of joy in Montreal this year.

Well, no it won’t be. That is a certainty as the team failed to qualify for the postseason. No Canadiens in the playoffs and we are anticipating the arrival of a late-season ice storm. I’m not sure about Mudville, but there’s certainly a lack of joy in Montreal this year and lots to crank about.

On the other hand, all is not lost. You see, part of being a fan of the Montreal Canadiens is a deep-rooted dislike for their two old rivals, the Toronto Maple Leafs and the Boston Bruins. It just so happens that these two clubs are facing each other in the first round of the playoffs. Like scorpions in a bottle we, Habs fans, can sit back and watch the on-ice clash. Personally, if I have to select one over the other, I have to go with the Bruins.

Except now the hated-Bruins are up against the hated-Leafs. So, for perhaps the first time in my life, I find myself being able to side with the Boston skaters 

I like the city of Boston; I root for the New England Patriots (and have been doing so for many years, not merely jumping on the recent bandwagon) and in the absence of a Montreal MLB franchise I cheer on the Red Sox. But of course, the Bruins are a different kettle of clam chowder as they are usually in direct competition with my Canadiens. Except now the hated-Bruins are up against the hated-Leafs. So, for perhaps the first time in my life, I find myself being able to side with the Boston skaters as they take on Toronto. It’s a bit weird at first, but I’m getting used to it.

I’m even thinking of dropping my Rs when I speak, and debating the correct pronunciation of Faneuil Hall (does it rhyme with manual or Daniel).

I can’t say that I really care which team wins the series, but I have found a different angle from which to partake of the annual spring playoff viewing. I’d much rather be watching the Canadiens play of course, but for the next little while, I’ll have to make do with being a Boston fan. I’m even thinking of dropping my Rs when I speak (Pahk the cah in Hahvahd Yahd), and debating the correct pronunciation of Faneuil Hall (does it rhyme with manual or Daniel).

But before tonight’s game in Toronto, I’ll be cheering on all the participants in the Boston Marathon and hoping for a safe race.

DCMontreal – Deegan Charles Stubbs – is a Montreal writer born and raised who likes to establish balance and juxtapositions; a bit of this and a bit of that, a dash of Yin and a soupçon of Yang, some Peaks and an occasional Frean and maybe a bit of a sting in the tail! Please follow DCMontreal on Twitter and on Facebook, and add him on Google+
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Miley Cyrus nude on the cover of Rolling Stone; just keep that controversy coming!

MileyCyrusRollingStoneTo paraphrase Dr. Hook, “She keeps getting richer, and now she’s got her picture, on the cover of the Rolling Stone”. Once again Miley Cyrus is the focus of heaps of media attention; perhaps it’s more accurate to say she’s still the focus as it never seems to stop. Now the palaver is over her topless photo on the cover of Rolling Stone. Before you abandon this insightful post in search of Ms. Cyrus’ bits and pieces, keep in mind that Rolling Stone, being a reputable publication, has her positioned such that nothing untoward is visible. The strategic placing of her arms and, Viola! all is covered. This brings up the old adage of a tree falling in the forest making noise or not if no one is there to hear it – if a young performer appears topless on a magazine cover but hides the essentials is she topless?

The only bad controversy is the one you’re not at the heart of.

I congratulate Ms. Cyrus and her management team – let’s call it Miley Inc. – on discovering yet again that sex sells. This coupled with another truth – controversy sells, leads to a phenomenon that could be called sexy controversy sells like mad. Think back to Marilyn Monroe’s famous photo with her dress being blown up as she stood on a New York subway vent in the sidewalk. Certainly a classic but let’s not fool ourselves into thinking it was in any way not calculated. Not that Miley is in Marilyn’s league, but it’s the same principle applied to another, more accepting generation – remember it was not all that long ago that the sight of a woman’s ankle raised hackles and, I dare say, other things.

… if a young performer appears topless on a magazine cover but hides the essentials is she topless?

Don’t those who find this offensive understand, no doubt after careful consideration of the evidence, maybe several times to be absolutely certain, that the worst thing they can do is make a fuss about it? Rolling Stone’s recent cover of Boston bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev proved that. It came under fire and was pulled from many stores but still sold more than usual. The only bad controversy is the one you’re not at the heart of.

Logo_3DCMontreal is a Montreal writer born and raised who likes to establish balance and juxtapositions; a bit of this and a bit of that. a dash of Yin and a soupçon of Yang, some Peaks and Freans and maybe a bit of a sting in the tail! Please follow DC on Twitter @DCMontreal and on Facebook, and add him on Google+
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Boston bombing, Humor, Interview, News, Wordpress

Rolling Stone; summer magazine experience

As I thought would be the case when I wrote  this blog post, the recent controversial cover of Rolling Stone featuring a photograph of Boston Marathon Bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev on the cover resulted in a 20% increase in sales. Despite the fact some very big retail chains refused to sell the August edition of the magazine because they claimed the photograph glamorized the suspect, it would seem the furor fueled sales rather than snuffing them.

… the recent controversial cover of Rolling Stone featuring a photograph of Boston Marathon Bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev on the cover resulted in a 20% increase in sales

I have to admit I was one of those who bought the magazine. I read a lot, mostly novels and the occasional bit of non-fiction, but summer is my time for magazines. So I thought I’d see what all the kerfuffle was about and instead of picking up The Atlantic or Mother Jones, I gave Rolling Stone a shot.

Readers were left waiting for that one tidbit of insight that would make this article stand out from the umpteen thousand other TV and print pieces on the suspect that never came

Having read the August issue I can tell you I learned a few things, but not from the articles I thought would provide me with information. The lengthy piece on Tsarnaev left me feeling it had been cobbled together mostly from television reports and a few interviews with friends who wouldn’t be identified. He was a nice guy, never thought he’d do a thing like this, he was a great wrestler, he idolized his brother, and on-and-on it went. Family background was a rehashing of trips between the US and Europe, nothing new there. Readers were left waiting for that one tidbit of insight that would make this article stand out from the umpteen thousand other TV and print pieces on the suspect that never came.

In another item in the August Rolling Stone it was revealed that at the age of 80, Willie Nelson still consumes vast amounts of dope and likes to sleep on a bus. (I imagine that description fits half the high-school kids in North America!) I like Nelson’s music, but I get a bit tired of the same old tales of his love of weed, whether in print or on television interviews.

I could give away 1 million albums and claim to have a million seller if that’s the way it works

But all was not lost, I did learn that Jay Z and Samsung teamed up to give away, via mobile app, 1 million copies of his latest album, Magna Carta Holy Grail. The folks who came up with the idea were plenty steamed when Billboard Magazine refused to take into consideration the freebies when calculating their Top 40 list. They claim the criterion is record “sales” not give-aways. I could give away 1 million albums and claim to have a million seller if that’s the way it works. However the people who hand out platinum records see it Jay Z’s way and awarded him one. Go figure.

On the whole I think I’ll stick to The Atlantic.

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Blogging, Boston bombing, Crime, History, Montreal, News, Politics, Sports

Results: After the Boston bombing, are you more careful about attending public events?

This week’s Weekly Writing Challenge focuses on the use of forms. I took a recent post, and added a form for feedback at the end. I had never used a form before, but will certainly consider doing so. The comments were lengthy and often heartfelt. As for statistics, 100% of those who responded said they were not more concerned about attending public events after the Boston bombing.

I was pleased with the comments I received, but was surprised they arrived by email, and were not displayed the way comments usually are. Perhaps I didn’t set the form properly!

Here is the form I used, and below a selection of the comments.

Comment: I don’t really attend many public events, but there is one that I’m planning to attend: the Out of the Darkness Overnight Walk taking place in Washington, D.C. on June 1st. It helps support the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, a cause that is extremely important to me. There is no way I’m letting some idiots keep me from attending an event that is meaningful to me personally and has the potential to help make a positive difference for people whose struggle with suicidal ideation is even harder than my own.
After the Boston bombing, are you more careful about attending public events?: No

 

Comment: Having served in the armed forces stationed in London during the height of the IRA bombings you just got used to the signs about unattended bags, the warnings on walls and on the tv and radio but if you watched every bag or allowed the warnings to get to you, your life would be nothing, if you allowed the terrorists to get in your head then they have won, life is more then worrying about something that may not happen. So get out and prove that you cannot be beaten.
After the Boston bombing, are you more careful about attending public events?: No

 

Comment: One of my believes is that I do not want to be lived by fear of what might or might not happen. I guess the safest place to be is at home. However, if you stay home indefinitely, never going anywhere out of fear of what might happen, you will miss out on a lot of fun, love, magical moments, and so on. So no matter what happens, go out and live!

After the Boston bombing, are you more careful about attending public events?: No

 

Comment: I try to forget the bad things like that!!
After the Boston bombing, are you more careful about attending public events?: No

 

 

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Boston bombing, Crime, News

Boston bombing victims, true tally may never be known

BostonOneThe total number of victims of the Boston Marathon bombing will never be known. I’m not referring to the fatalities, sadly they are painfully evident: three at the actual finish line bombing site and one afterward during the chase and manhunt for the suspects.

Even those who were seriously wounded by the explosions and had to receive medical treatment and in many cases undergo surgery in the immediate aftermath can be accounted for.

What I’m talking about is the ripple effect these bombings will have on those in attendance and beyond. Concentric rings of misery spreading over time.

The number of documented injured actually jumped dramatically a few days after the bombing as people who may have thought they had a minor condition that would go away by itself with time,such as a ringing in the ears, decided they better have it looked at by a doctor.

What I’m talking about is the ripple effect these bombings will have on those in attendance and beyond.

When I say the actual number of those touched by the heinous and cowardly attack on Patriot’s Day in Boston may never be known I am referring to what some may call collateral or tertiary harm. I don’t think we’ll ever know how many people who were in the Boylston Street area when the bombs went off will suffer permanent hearing damage. I recall reading an article many years ago about the collateral effects of urban bombings in Ireland and England during The Troubles. The same effects will be felt by people in the Boston attack.

Another ring in the ripple of effect is psychological (I’m no psychologist, but I don’t think you have to be B. F. Skinner to understand). How many people will forever be afraid to attend public events, sporting events, any kind of gathering of people? How many will struggle with nervous problems and PTSD as a result of a close call? How many will feel survivor guilt?

The damage caused by the Boston bombers, in fact by all terrorists, spreads like a disease after the fact.

This ripple extends yet again beyond the people actually in the vicinity of the explosions to the members of their families. How many parents will be on pins and needles every time their child, even adult children, attend a gathering?

The damage caused by the Boston bombers, in fact by all terrorists, spreads like a disease after the fact. Once the media attention has switched to something else, and Boston gets caught-up in the things that make it a great city, there will still be those nameless victims who will fight the effects daily for years to come. Perhaps forever.

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