Hidden Among The Leaves; High-Flying Plastic


The annual Quebec construction vacation is underway. Each year for the last week of July and first of August all construction sites close down. There are very few exceptions but some include urgent road and infrastructure work.  Some people understand the logic in this, get the vacations out of the way so that suppliers and contractors can carry on without interruption. Others think it is a pain.

Will the tree with the plastic evidently trapped in its branches adapt over the years and produce plastic leaves? Leaves that are immune to aphids, Emerald Ash Borers, and wind burn.

The school adjacent to my apartment building has been having major brickwork repairs carried out on it over the last few years. The work is done during the summer when the school is less in use. When the workers close up for vacation they enclose any openings with heavy-gauge plastic sheeting to keep out the rain. This is all fine and dandy until the wind picks up.

Two summers ago the work was focussed on my end of the school building. Sure enough, during the vacation, a strong storm blew through and dislodged a significant portion of the protective plastic. Two pieces became ensnarled in a tree and have remained there through two winters and two springs. Seemingly unmovable. Blustery winds and snow have failed in removing the plastic from the tree top. At least the tree does not appear to be bothered by it, as it just goes on shedding its leaves in the fall and popping them back in the spring.

Today I noticed that on the other end of the school, where the work is being done this summer, there is yet another incident of plastic flapping about in the wind. I fear that one good gust and it will be airborne, looking for a tree to settle in. There’s got to be a better way.

Could it be that there is a special process at work, hidden to the naked eye? Will the tree with the plastic evidently trapped in its branches adapt over the years and produce plastic leaves? Leaves that are immune to aphids, Emerald Ash Borers, and wind burn.

DCMontreal – Deegan Charles Stubbs – is a Montreal writer born and raised who likes to establish balance and juxtapositions; a bit of this and a bit of that, a dash of Yin and a soupçon of Yang, some Peaks and an occasional Frean and maybe a bit of a sting in the tail! Please follow DCMontreal on Twitter and on Facebook, and add him on Google+
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