Boston’s Never-ending Festival of Snow


Boston_Bridge

If I turn on my TV and there are not a bunch of CNN reporters up to their arses in Boston snow I figure something is wrong.

Boston is one of my favorite places, but what ever have you done to deserve this incredibly snowy fate? If I turn on my TV and there are not a bunch of CNN reporters up to their arses in Boston snow I figure something is wrong. (Interestingly these usually include Rosa Flores and Miguel Marquez – is there an assignment editor with a sense of humor who figures the Latinos should report on blizzards?) Like Montreal, you are a winter city, but even winter cities have their limits. Meteorological reports are calling for yet another substantial dump of snow for your area later this week.

Why Boston? You won the Super Bowl in a rather dramatic and much talked about manner. Could it be some sort of Seattle curse that has been visited upon your city? Nope, no worries there as that would most likely involve vast amounts of coffee and you have already handled both a Tea Party and a tsunami of molasses.

(is there a) Seattle curse that has been visited upon your city? Nope, no worries there as that would most likely involve vast amounts of coffee and you have already handled both a Tea Party and a tsunami of molasses.

Your Bruins have lost all four regular season games to my Canadiens, but that should not bring record snow as punishment, even if I frankly believe the Bruins are playing possum (opossum?) and will rise to the task (Rask?) should the teams meet in the playoffs, a virtual rite of spring for many of us.

We can debate why this winter has been so wicked in  New England until the snow melts – well, maybe no one could be expected to do that. But more important is how to deal with the situation. I saw on television that there are numerous “snow farms” around the city. Why with all that fallen snow you would want to grow more on farms is a mystery to me. Melting the snow must be done carefully lest flooding result. Dumping it in the river is one short-term solution, but remember all that urban snow that has been collected from the streets of Boston is far from pure. Salt and god knows what chemicals that are used to keep streets passable end up in the snow. We used to blow the snow onto lawns and parks until the grass started dying from the chemicals.

Boston_HydrantHydrant_Montreal

The mayor asked citizens to lend a hand by digging out fire hydrants. The first problem many of the well-intentioned citizens encountered was finding the hydrants in the first place so they could dig them out. This is where I felt a pang of disappointment. As a snow city Boston should know that even with an average amount of snow, hydrants will soon become buried. The solution is simple: long poles attached to hydrants allow for easy sighting even during a snowstorm.

These poles can be attached during the summer and left, providing a clear view of all-important fire hydrants even after a major snowfall.

Boston_Hydrant

Of course if there are no poles, a little improvisation goes a long way. Part of me wants to point out that by the end of April the Bruins will have no need of their hockey-sticks, and they could be put to use. But another part of me believes in hockey gods, and understands that would be tempting fate!

DCS_Grad_2 DCMontreal – Deegan Charles Stubbs – is a Montreal writer born and raised who likes to establish balance and juxtapositions; a bit of this and a bit of that, a dash of Yin and a soupçon of Yang, some Peaks and an occasional Frean and maybe a bit of a sting in the tail! Please follow DC on Twitter @DCMontreal and on Facebook, and add him on Google+

 

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One thought on “Boston’s Never-ending Festival of Snow

  1. We don’t live in Boston (we did, but not since 1990) so we have different issue. No hydrants, nothing to dig out. We don’t salt roads because we are the watershed for the region and we all have wells. Unless you want to kill the aquifer, salt is a big no no. So we just suffer. To be fair, we are kind of used to it. We stock up and tuck in for the annual cabin fever festival. For this, we have cable, wifi, DVDs, and each other. Books. Music. Cameras. We worry more about flooding than other regions. We personally worry about it because we’re on a downslope and I’m disinclined to pump out the basement. Again. It’s not that we don’t get this much snow. It’s that we don’t get this much this FAST. In the hideous winter of 98-99, we got 110″, but we didn’t get it in two weeks.

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